Personal Art Blog

Sharing the lessons I teach at the Artist Guild and the personal discoveries in my art.

Sunday, December 22, 2013

Fracturing from the Imagination. Step by Step.



Fracturing from the Imagination.

8x6in  oil on canvas panel   SOLD

This is a re-post I thought some of you would find interesting.
I am trying to de-stress, relax and enjoy family over the
Christmas week.
Hope you are all doing the same.

Artist Note

I love painting from my imagination.
Finally at the stage where I feel I know the lemon well enough
to paint without looking at one. I start off with a basic design
and then I respond to what the paint does on the canvas.
Here are the steps I took to do this piece.


First I randomly applied color
in two stages.
A thin underneath wash of colors
see the cool mauve and transp
yellow oxide.
Then I did the drawing of shapes
with a rigger  brush and dark paint.
Next I painted the warm red, lifting off
with the handy tool to expose underneath colors
leaving random areas and fruit, plain.




I added the dark at the top
and made a slightly darker
square at bottom right.
This was intuitive.
At this stage they were all going to be
lemons.







When I had put in the dark top
and moved down to place the darker area
I realized it was because I need another dark
so I made the lemon into a plum.
This is the great thing about painting
from the imagination. You have time to
listen to your inner art voice and
respond accordingly.
I paint at this stage in complete silence.
No music or story going on.



I usually start with the lightest and
focal point area as I did here.

Anyway, at this stage I feel  confident
that I can solve the rest of the painting
and as I feel the fracturing technique becoming
more and more natural

This post was in 2012 so by now the
fracturing has certainly become as natural as breathing.




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38 comments:

  1. I found the process very interesting and love the result. I also love that you strive to paint from memory...it just occurred to me last week that I should pursue that also. thanks so much for this post.

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  2. Thanks for letting me know you found it interesting, Maria. Your paintings are lovely.

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  3. Julie. I loved reading about the process..its all new to me but nevertheless, interesting. This painting is beautiful...who knows, maybe someday you'll make a video so we can see you work!! How wonderful would that be!!

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    1. You are important to me, Hilda, because you have followed my work for a while now and have been a constant supporter. I thank you and am pleased you find the fracturing interesting.
      A video? Someone has been videoing my demos in the guild so will ask to look at them to see the quality.

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  4. Hello,julie!I love lemons!I had a kitchen and two bathrooms decorated with stencils and painted pottery by me, some years ago! Painting from imagination, when the subject is interiorised, it is e a moment of great joy! The contrast between the color of lemon and the atmosphere of your work is wonderful!Happy Sunday,Rita.

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    1. Thanks, Rita. I picked lemons to learn how to use the color yellow and it was before the DPW Challenge. Now I love the shape of them.

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  5. Whatever you paint and no matter how you do it , it always comes out stunningly...I am not at all surprised you can paint from memory and get this kind of result :-) ....love reading about the process .

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    1. Hi jane - great complement. Thank you. Glad you enjoyed reading the process.

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  6. Hi Julie, I found your blog for the first time today, and I must say I am fascinated. I love reading about all your hints and techniques and it goes without saying that your work is wonderful. I particularly love this painting. It is so interesting with your "fracturing" technique. I read back through several pages of your blog, but could not find an a description of this technique. Would you mind explaining?

    Looking forward to following your blog.

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    1. Hi Carol, the fracturing is something I have been developing for quite some time and as I was developing it, I would paint in a regular manner in-between the pieces until now...and finally I can see it is coming through all the time. I have not got it down to where I totally understand it, but I am making notes and it does have a structure. It is not as random as it may look. I am hoping to post a video one day on the blog to show the steps.

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  7. I love your work! I agree with Carol--could you explain the fracturing technique?

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    1. Thanks Paula. I came up with the term, fracturing, to help the artists I teach understand what we were doing to the paint surface. As I am still in the discovery stage I cannot say there is just one way to do it. It is a process and I am trying to share the stages as it all comes together

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  8. Like Carol, I would like a description of your technique if you don't mind, Julie. The style is so fresh, clean and free, I would love to try it. Your step by step artist notes are invaluable to me as a new artist. I'm keeping them all. Karen B.

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    1. Hi Karen, The technique is what I am trying to show in this step by step, Karen. You cannot have the top part without the underneath. The top part can be copied by looking at it, but what is under it all is very important

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  9. These are all so good, Julie. Thanks for sharing your techniques with all of us, would love to hear more about the fracturing. I have especially loved all the lemon paintings.

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    1. Thanks, Wanda. If you read my reply to Karen above it is another way to explain what I am doing.

      Love your painting Fresh Catch!

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  10. Thanks for your quick reply. It seems to be similar to what I am trying to do, but, you are working with a brush and I am attempting with a palette knife. Fascinating stuff!

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    1. Actually Carol, Although I use the brush, the knife is an important tool for me and I have mentioned the type and brand of painting knife in previous blogs.
      I agree - it is fascinating.

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  11. This is a terrific post. I've been curious about how you get the tiny spots of color with the knife in the final stage. With this post, I see that the background is the source for many of those wonderful bits of color. The shimmering quality of these paintings is really captivating.

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  12. Bless you, LS. You do understand how the underneath is so important.

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  13. Beautiful Julie!! I think you will have to go beyond a video and offer a workshop. I think it would fill up fast.

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  14. Best explanations yet. The phrase what we are doing to the paint surface is what rang true for me. My abstracts would be more successful with some of this technique applied. Great paintings. Love the progression photos.

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    1. Thanks Helen. Hope it helps with the abstracts.

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  15. Simple diagonal composition with a strong contrasts affecting emotions. I love the backlight.
    And thank you for great demo.

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    1. You write such intelligent comments, Maga. I appreciate you for sharing them.

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  16. So great to see the process, especially how much it changed from the original sketch. I'm surprised it wasn't from life; you nailed the yeast bloom on the plum!

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  17. Thanks Janine. The reason I like the plum is the yeast bloom...although I didn't know that is what is was.

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  18. Julie
    Can you explain in detail what the fracturing technique is?
    It is gorgeous and you refer to it but I would love more explanation.

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  19. i think i get this... wow... thank you!

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  20. You have such an amazing style Julie - so nice to see it unfold step by step. Particularly impressed that you could do it from your imagination!

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  21. Wishing you a happy, restful holiday! Margie

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  22. ...... You were born to paint and what a generous teacher you are.. Thanks for the fracturing lesson(s). Every painting you shared with us throughout the year was gorgeous!
    Hoping you and yours have a great holiday. Merry Christmas Julie

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  23. Dear Julie - this is great to see how your thinking and painting process takes place. Your art always shows that you paint from the heart and that is why I love it so. Have a relaxing Christmas with your family.

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  24. I always enjoy your thoughtful blog posts Julie, but especially these, where you go through your whole thought process of a particular painting. I haven't done much "painting from the imagination"....usually I work from life, but I'm thinking some new exercises for 'stretching the brain' would be quite fun- who knows where it will lead? Thanks again!- Merry Christmas & a wonderful new year to you & your family!

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  25. You've inspired me, Julie, to have a go at painting from memory. I haven't tried it before always relying on photos or setups. I am curious to know how much my intuition will guide me. Having a "framework" as you've put forth here in your photos and description is such a help.
    Love your reflected light passages always!

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  26. Truly absorbing to see the stages leading up to the finished painting which, I have to say, is a gorgeous image. Thank you for sharing your knowledge. Have a very Merry Christmas and a successful New Year!!

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  27. Somehow I DID miss a post. I love these Christmas ornaments and never mind a wonderful repost!

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  28. On second view...I realize I am looking at a lemon and a plum. Apparently this early Christmas morning I am thinking of Christmas ornaments (mine will all get packed away tomorrow. LOL)

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I love that you are taking the time to comment and thank you for it. I am sure other readers will enjoy them too. If you cannot comment through this format then email me at juliefordoliver@gmail.com
Cheers,
Julie