Personal Art Blog

Sharing the lessons I teach at the Artist Guild and the personal discoveries in my art.

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Roses In A Square (click on to go to blog)


Roses In A Square
8"x8" oil on raymar panel  $200.
Purchase HERE

Artist Note.
I am rather pleased with this one.
I feel the new fracturing marks work well 
and I really like the colors.

I came up with the colors from a 
Monet Painting.
I am using his waterlily work for 
 this month's Guild's focus 
which is on Color harmony.

This one is the Analogous harmony
  that is
where you follow the color wheel.
In this case, green, blue,
with a dip into the purple.
Monet's emphasis was on the blues
Mine, the greens.
I had pre-mixed all the colors 
that he used, testing them first
on the plastic sleeve 
 the photo was placed into.

I then used them in this still life.
The proportions of the colors
 are different of course.
His lily colors are my roses
His green tree reflections are my leaves,
and the different blue colors 
are my background. 
His accent of purple is my vase.

Have you used a famous painting 
to give you ideas for
your color harmony?

30 comments:

  1. A lovely piece. I really like the different greens.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thanks Robin . the greens were Monet's greens .
      You sure are a wiz with the colored pencil!!

      Delete
  2. Ah Julie this is gorgeous. What a wonderful way to use Monet's color palette. He has always been such a favorite of mine. I must tell you that I love your subject matter just a bit better than his water lilies :)! Have a blessed day my friend. Hugs!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You should see the purples he used in the one I am using now . He had such a beautiful sense of color. Thanks for liking my roses,dear friend.
      Love the song Green Fields. .

      Delete
  3. What a great idea to use Monet's painting for inspiration. I've been studying his work recently and also Cezanne. I have several books about them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You cannot go wrong Nancy with either of them. I did not like Monet's earlier work as much as his later paintings but Cezanne I liked all the way through.

      Delete
  4. What an excellent way to teach color harmony!! And a truly beautiful interpretation!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Roxanne. I love your wonderful abstractions and such great colors!

      Delete
  5. You should be pleased indeed; this is such a delicious painting! Your cleverly adopted color harmony works beautifully, Julie, but I think my favorite part is the subtle tones of those roses. So accurately soft and nuanced.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello, good buddy, and thank you as always for taking the time to really look at my work. Happy you like it.
      I looked for your wonderful painting of the girl leaping into the water and it is not on your blog... so where did I see it?

      Delete
    2. Thank you, dear chum! I often paint women taking a leap...they're popular at my gallery. The painting I think you refer to was originally on my blog, but more recently posted on FB and Instagram. (Since blogs appear to falling out of fashion, I'm trying to gradually add my portfolio to those two social media platforms.) I see your work on both your blog and IG too.

      Delete
  6. How can you not love this painting, so beautiful ! I never used famous paintings to get ideas for the color harmony, but it's a great idea, and now I probably will :-)

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is as always, a beautiful piece, Julie!... gorgeous color and texture.
    I should be using more color like Monet!!... instead of the dark that I use. I guess that's why I love Rembrandt so much.lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I always see color in your work, Hilda. ALWAYS...come to think of it...doesnt the little, "Drama Queen" have on a beautiful blue dress?

      Delete
  8. so well done! i could tell the influence right away :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. A lovely work, Julie, and a fascinating insight into the mind of an artist and a glimpse at how the creative process works. Each time you post there is both beauty and intellectual stimulus to look forward to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is a lovely comment and very much appreciated, David.
      How about you with the wild bird in your hand...wow!
      But the ducks in a row pic is priceless.

      Delete
  10. Great idea to use the same color harmony. Your textures are beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Joan, I really enjoyed doing this one.
      I was marveling at how tiny your last two sketches were and how they look larger. Kudos!

      Delete
  11. Very beautiful art work and so nice colours !!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Using Monet's water lily painting colors as your inspiration was a great idea. And you should be very pleased with the roses - I find them so difficult to paint and you have handled them with honesty and brilliance. Job well done, Julie!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is working out well because it is for the focus of this months Guild classes. They are all doing great work from it.
      Love the portrait and thanks for sharing your own little block.

      Delete
  13. What a treat to learn this from you, Julie! I feel as if I'm in your classroom:)
    I have never used a famous painting for this exercise, but definitely will!
    And your painting - Monsieur Monet would definitely approve!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You always say the nicest things Chris. Thanks for the supportive warmth. It means such a lot.

      Delete
  14. Oh my, Julie - this little painting is a treasure trove of texture, color and downright beauty. I adore seeing your bush work and how you achieve such luscious results.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Replies
    1. Thank you Tanza. Your post of the ancient buildings really was interesting.

      Delete

I love that you are taking the time to comment and thank you for it. I am sure other readers will enjoy them too. If you cannot comment through this format then email me at juliefordoliver@gmail.com
Cheers,
Julie