Personal Art Blog

Sharing the lessons I teach at the Artist Guild and the personal discoveries in my art.

Friday, September 28, 2012

Sunflowers and Vessels



Sunflowers and Vessels

8x6in oil on canvas panel  $125.

A friend brought me some sunflowers this afternoon.
I thought they would be all gone by this time of year,
but these were from her garden.

Artist Note.

Below is an old painting that I had never put on
my blog because I had two others with the same items
already on there. On this piece I had changed the
background several times with light - dark - and middle values,
purely for the learning experience. After each change I checked
my pulse for the type of response I was getting.
Great learning technique.

Being short of time I decided to use the painting for the sunflowers.
I wiped the panel with some linseed oil and Gamsol first.
Placing the sunflowers in a blue vase
I decided to place it where the 
striped vessel was.
 I altered the lighting,
placed a smaller,
striped piece of paper
and had at it.
I think it is a great example
of how a painting can be
changed to suit the different
needs at different times.
I cannot do a good job of fracturing because of the texture
underneath but I did use a knife and brush.
I do not want to get into asking myself
if any of the changes were better than the others
because I have learned that it is the act of painting
which gives me pleasure. Once I start analyzing too much
the pleasure can disappear.
I am planning and  formulating my future DPW Artbyte
and want to thank
all of you who sent good wishes and support.
What great friends you all are.

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43 comments:

  1. It is a classic beauty Julie! Changes can bring so much of satisfaction, the vibes come straight from the heart to change what and to stop when! Yes, look fwd to your artbyte and all the best!

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    1. You are right, Padmaaja, and it shows in your work.

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  2. There is always things that were better with the original, but overall I think it got better. I also hate the dry structure of an old painting. I can really mess up my lines.

    I am really looking forward to see you work with your palette knife in the Artbyt. I bought some, but I couldn't get it too work as I wanted. I know I have to practice more.

    You're posts are really a learning experience too.

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    1. Nice of someone with your ability to be so open. I love to experiment and the joy of the daily blog for me has been the freedom from preparing the same way as I do for my larger pieces. Daily, I can try anything I want and learn as I go along. Perfection goes out of the door and if a good one comes along I do not even show it, I keep it for myself to learn from. Do you ever do that?

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    2. There is paintings that I keep, but I do show them. I haven't come as far as you. I think I do OK, but I have so much learning and growing to do. Sometimes a painting is worth more for me than the money. Partly because it will remind me when I got it really right and gives me clues how I did it.

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    3. You said something here which I think applies to ALL of us. ...so much learning and growing to do.
      One of the things I love about my art life is that every single act of painting I do, I learn something, and as I learn, I grow. I also learn from others and your work included, Roger. You have a beautiful way with color and your harmonies are amazing. Thank you.

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  3. Dear Julie, it's really interesting how it can change the way a composition! For me painting is an action, first of all, an enjoyable action during the day and my life.
    As fracturing and watercolor do not seem close, with some colors and techniques as wet-on- damp , imaginative attempt could be made!

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    1. Hi Rita - My earliest fracturing was in watercolor!
      I agree with you about the action being enjoyable and for me - necessary. Also agree that a composition can be changed with the smallest change

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    2. I am happy with this news,dear Julie, I wait with curiosity!

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  4. I like the thinking behind the picture almost as much as I like the painting itself :0) The idea of moving 'pieces' about is intriguing.

    The only time I call that sort of tune is drawing old sailing ships, where, because I have all the plans, I can draw it from any angle I like (usually seagull eye-view)...technoart :0)

    You choice/mix of colours hits the spot with me every time ... the 'green' of the flower vase ... off the scale wow!

    Thank you for this post, and for taking so much time from your bust schedule to answer my boring little 'packaging' post

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    1. Hi John,
      I love the idea of being able to look at the plans of a ship and know how it would be three dimension-ally. Amazing tyu can do that.
      I saw the pen and ink drawings from the watercolor show at Mall Galleries. Makingamark.blogspot had a fabulous piece on the show.

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    2. A great site thank you, Julie, I've become a follower

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  5. Perfect job of upcycling, and either way it is beautiful to my eyes, Julie.

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    1. ha! "upcycling" love it. And thanks for liking it. (Sounding facebookish there.)
      I see the piano finally arrived. Hope it sounds great.

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  6. Isn't that the truth? We are so often focused on the finished product (or something else for that matter) that we forget about how wonderful the act of painting itself can be.

    I hope your tutorials are well received. They certainly should be:)

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    1. Thanks Libby. Your new painting shows you enjoyed the act of painting it.
      As for the tutorials - I am putting a lot of time into planning the best way to present them.

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  7. Love those Sunflowers, Julie. They brighten the entire piece! What a difference adding the flowers!

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    1. Thanks Hilda.
      Sunflowers will made anything look good!
      I am looking forward to seeing your new piece. I know you must be working on one.

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  8. How cool. what a great idea and way to re-use and re-invigorate an old painting. I love your blog! And thanks for the comment on my "white cat" painting. She left us this week, and I'm glad I did the painting before. I had to put it in the closet for a bit. Saying goodbye is really hard. I appreciate your comment. Best -- Tonya

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    1. Sorry to hear your cat passed on, Tonya. More than ever you will be glad you did that beautiful painting. Thanks for taking the time to comment.

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  9. Goody, goody and artbyte! YAY! I'm looking forward to that!
    I love seeing how you reworked this painting. Checking your pulse for a response is a great plan!

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  10. Goody, goody an artbyte! YAY! I'm looking forward to that. I loved seeing how you reworked this painting. Checking your pulse for a response is a great plan!

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    1. Glad to have you back and hope the trip was great.
      Looking forward to seeing your new paintings back on your blog

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  11. I love things about both of the paintings Julie...can't wit to see the artbyte, congratulations!

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    1. You are so nice, thanks Dana.
      You painted those bikini bottoms so well!

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  12. Replies
    1. as are all of yours. Loved seeing the pencil appear again!

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  13. Oh wow... things can be moved on a painting and you can get a totally different piece of art (an equally beautiful piece of art), but I can still see the artist :)
    I'm quite impressed by the fact, though, because I have never used oils and with watercolour things CAN'T be moved or it's me who doesn't know how...
    Hugs and smiles.

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    1. Oh, yes - you can move watercolor. Have you tried the white (sponge) eraser? You must have them in Athens too or I can send you one.

      thanks for the visit.

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    2. I had totally forgot the white eraser-thank you for reminding me!! And a big thanks for your kind offer, dear Julie, but I think I will find one :)

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  14. Love the knife application of a myriad of gorgeous colors in both pieces, Julie!

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    1. I enjoyed your textural approach to your cow painting and I couldn't resist pulling your
      leg a bit.

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  15. Love this painting and the effect of fracturing,beautiful.

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    1. Thank YOU Diana. Very clever design you have on your still life. Rectangles and curves repeating.

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  16. Julie, I like what you have done and I too, redo paintings to suit my current likes. I think this works.

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    1. Thank you Barbara. Some do and some don't. Art is like golf. Some days are better than others!

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  17. Interesting...the pulse thing. I agree that it is the practice of art, whether it be painting, sculpting, singing, dancing, etc., that feeds the soul! A beautiful outcome is great, but the experiences that get you there are priceless!

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    1. I am glad you agree, Pamela. You pput it so well. Thank you.

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  18. Hello Julie:) Again a beauty in your special style. So nice!

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    1. How nice - thanks, Renate. Love your figure. You captured a sensitive feel to it.

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  19. You have wonderful color in your latest one too, Karen. thanks for the visit.

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  20. I agree the flowers brightened up the painting and just made it more interesting. Aren't you glad you have a photo of the old work though? I am always happy I have photos of pieces I either change or just add to as you have. What's DPW Artbyte?

    PS: LOVE the polka dot vase!

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I love that you are taking the time to comment and thank you for it. I am sure other readers will enjoy them too. If you cannot comment through this format then email me at juliefordoliver@gmail.com
Cheers,
Julie