Personal Art Blog

Sharing the lessons I teach at the Artist Guild and the personal discoveries in my art.

Sunday, August 26, 2012

Red Teapot - On the Shelf #3




On the Shelf #3

6x8in  oil on canvas panel  $125. SOLD

A few of my favorite items on the new shelf in my studio.

Artist Note.

I have overhead light for the still life set-ups on the shelf. I can change it
to suit my preference, but for now I am exploring using it this way.
My previous two set-ups have shown the top of the shelf
and I felt like a change.

When I am looking at the shelf straight on like this, there is only a thin
line of light to define the top of it. The trick is to indicate how deep it is
by overlapping some items. The same principle is used in landscapes.
Starting at the bottom moving up...
The angle of the sunflower shows volume in space next to
the flat drop of the leaf.  (I was tempted to overlap the flower but resisted)
The top part of the leaf, the curve of the stalk, plus the little spice
container added another level in front of the pot. Same with the bud
in front of the bowl.
The matted print set behind everything, completes
the illusion of depth to the shelf.






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33 comments:

  1. So beautiful and moody. And I love the punch of red. Just perfect!

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    1. Thanks Ann. I love to use red and this teapot is a real favorite.
      Your male head is great today.

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  2. Dear Julie, it's nice to recognize some objects in this painting!
    They are the special signs of your beautiful works of art.
    You paint these objects as the characters of a always new history,which is truly beautiful to look at!

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    1. Hello dear Rita - yes, it is easy to see the things I paint a lot. I like the way you put it... characters in a new history. Beautiful!

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    2. Congratulations Rita on the birth of beautiful Alice. I enjoyed reading your story.

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  3. Great explanaton. Thanks, Julie. And yes, a very nice painting. Love those reds.......

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    1. Thanks Helen - I am looking forward to seeing you do the egg for DPW Challenge

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    2. and I'll bet you will have a smile on your face! The results will be interesting for sure. Had little painting time but loved what I did this weekend.

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  4. Outstanding! I love the pure red that doesn't lean too pink or orange, your color work and set-ups are always just great!

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    1. Your own work is pretty amazing so I am going to take this comment and treasure it. Thanks, Mary.

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  5. Wonderful composition, i like the way you paint and your style
    Cheers!

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  6. Julie, I find this piece truly beautiful! You did a great job with the depth of the shelf too. What a stunning still life this is!

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    1. Thanks Crimson, I have to ask if that is your real name or one you use in the blogging world?

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  7. So nice catching up with your wonderful blog. You share so many insights and helpful information. Your beautiful work and giving teaching abilities are a gift!

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    1. You are generous and appreciated for it. Thanks Carol.
      Your horses today are really fabulous. Love the active brush work.

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  8. This red pot really pops...love this painting, Julie!!

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    1. Hilda you are great - thanks. Love your Chinatown painting!

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  9. You did get some great depth there through layering. Love the primary colors too against the "neutral" background. Always effective:)

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    1. Hi Libby - yes - I agree the neutrals are needed but I love painters who blast the colors and get away with it.
      Your blog is interesting today.

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  10. Beautiful painting! Thank you for sharing so much interesting information on your blog.:)

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    1. Thank you, Kathleen. I love your marble paintings.

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  11. I really like the beautiful muted colors in the front of the shelf and the back wall, Julie!!
    This painting has a timeless look.
    Love the layering lesson! :)

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    1. Hi Dean - yes, muted is a good word for the colors. I am feeling I am heading for some bright colors. I go back and forth.
      Love the clear beautiful colors on your chicken painting.

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  12. You definitely achieved the depth you were going for. I really like the thin band of light across the shelf top. Wonderful!

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    1. It is my favorite part, Nora. Light hitting an tiny area like that explains such a lot, subliminally.
      You are placing an artist for scale and depth in your series of figure sketches - same thing, don't you agree?

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  13. Very nice painting and I love your explanation about composition, depth etc. You could teach me a lot. =)

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  14. You are very generous, O' Master painter!

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  15. I love your paintings Julie! Everything is there; wonderful colours, emotions, thoughts, light, depth...
    Thank you again, for sharing details and tips! (to a novice like me, are a treasure)
    Warm regards.

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  16. thank you Konstantina, for this lovely complement.
    Allow me to return it by saying how much I loved the figure you did today.

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  17. Replies
    1. Ta! as busy as you are I appreciate the visit.

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  18. I always learn something from you Julie...and I have a new appreciation for still life art and the complexity of it. This is so beautiful. And I know I've asked you this before, but can I borrow your tea pot? :)

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    1. So we are learning from each other, Lisa. What a creative friendship...but after saying that...NOPE! You cannot have my teapot but I can mail you some images.

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I love that you are taking the time to comment and thank you for it. I am sure other readers will enjoy them too. If you cannot comment through this format then email me at juliefordoliver@gmail.com
Cheers,
Julie