Personal Art Blog

Sharing the lessons I teach at the Artist Guild and the personal discoveries in my art.

Monday, August 27, 2012

With Lemon, Please. On the Shelf #4





On the Shelf #4
Tea with Lemon Please.

6x8in  oil on canvas   $125.  SOLD

This is an older painting which has gone thru a revival!

Artist Note.

Here is the original painting.










I placed the teapot on the shelf over at the other end to see how it looked
and then I changed the painting.
First, I lightly sanded the surface and then I rubbed a mixture of 1/2 linseed
oil and 1/2 Gamsol, wiping off any residue. I used this as a medium for the
new layer of paint. Fat over lean rule!

When I placed the teapot on the shelf, my viewpoint changed.  I cut into
the table and created more of the dark area so the spoon would go off the edge.
I eliminated the lemon at the back because the shelf was not as deep as the
table I had set up the original items on.
I made the striped area more intense in color/value as I did the teapot.
I am not into deciding which one I prefer because I paint for the
sheer enjoyment and challenge of it. At the time I liked the original one
and I now like this one.
And if anyone is interested... I found it is hard to use the fracturing technique
over an old painting!

I want to thank Lauren Nelson for advising and sending directions
for me to place a "search box" on my blog. Check out her blog.
Cute title - PerPetuity. She works with rescuing animals too..Kind heart.
She is confident it will make it easier for people to find old information
on the fracturing technique.
She also advised me to take off that difficult word verification  
which had to be entered after leaving a comment.

I do appreciate everyone who has suffered through the verification process
and still commented on my blog. I hope this new way will make it quicker
as I love hearing from everyone. Ta!




Posted by Picasa

33 comments:

  1. Once again, the enthralling and perfect red- I love it!

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    Replies
    1. Glad you like it, Mary. Thanks. Love your apples.

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  2. Red is my favorite color and I love your masterful handling of its various highlights and shadows. Both versions of this painting are quite lovely, Julie.

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  3. Mine too. Thanks for the complement. I checked to see if you had finished your fowl painting. Are you working on it?

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  4. I deleted by accident several comments and this is the only way I could retrieve some.

    John Simlett has left a new comment on your post "With Lemon, Please. On the Shelf #4":


    Well I like my tea almost too hot to drink, from Assam,... strong enough to stand the spoon up in, with a dash of skimmed milk! But I would be very happy to use your red teapot :0)

    Although I like both pictures, the second one would be my choice. I love the way you have darkened the background, it seems to focus us more on the objects - enjoyed this, Julie (not Helen today)

    Roger Åkesson has left a new comment on your post "With Lemon, Please. On the Shelf #4":

    I wasn't sure first if you painted over the old paining or you did a new version of it, but I understand now that you painted over.
    I like things on both paintings. I have also done some newer versions of paintings, thinking that I can improve them and I usually ending up liking both for different reasons.

    I think you did a great job with it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Check their work at:
      John
      http://www.blogger.com/profile/18061920423331681586
      Roger
      Rhttp://rogerakesson.blogspot.com/ogers

      Delete
  5. Vibrant and rich with color and harmony! Beautiful painting, Julie, and especially meaningful because the added layer of revision has deeply enhanced the piece. Certainly one to be proud of ... well, all of yours are ones to be proud of.

    Best,
    Garry

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Gary. YOur last painting is beautiful. That cheese is perfect.

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  6. Your new search feature works very well.:) Love the new stronger version of your painting... You made great choices to add focus and drama. The darker background, the change of perspective on the table and the richer color. Thanks again for sharing so much of your process online.

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    Replies
    1. Glad the search works. it helped me today too.
      I enjoyed your comment because it showed me your really took the time to look as well as comment. I do appreciate it.
      Your marble series is awesome.

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  7. I liked the first take on the painting...but now see the great improvement you've performed! Love the changes!
    Also thanks for making commenting easier! :)

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    Replies
    1. Glad it will be easier too. Sometimes I get frustrated and plugging in the numbers too tiny to see and give up.

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  8. Strange..I don't know if my first comment went through. In case it didn't, I want you to know that I liked this post.

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  9. I have been tempted to suggest to you (and many others) turning off the word verification. Yay! :)

    There's that gorgeous tea post again. I love what you did to it.

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  10. I like the changes you've made to this one. The table's angle and the beautiful red make it a stronger composition, in my opinion. I change things in my paintings quite often, because after living with them for a while I see things I hadn't seen before or discover something I thing would work better. So is it hard to use your fracturing technique on your old paintings because of the painting's texture underneath or because the paint isn't completely wet on the entire painting?
    It's a beautiful painting and so is your previous one! I love your red tea pot!

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    Replies
    1. Yes - I found it hard to fracture because part of my technique is to remove some of the paint with the handy shaper. The old paint pulled somehow and then little bits of old texture came thru even though I sanded it.
      I agree with seeing things with a fresh eye and I think it is because I know more too, the more I paint.
      Thanks for the great comment Jennifer.

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  11. I LOVE your painting, Julie! I need to tell you that my two youngest sons are artists. I have their paintings/drawings throughout my house. They both work for gaming companies and are doing quite well. I'm your newest follower :)

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    Replies
    1. Hi Kitty - lucky you having two sons who like to paint and draw.
      Thanks for saying hello.

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  12. Love seeing the revival process Julie! I'm been doing a bit of that myself lately. The fracturing makes it so much more personal and interesting to me. The reflection is amazing!

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    1. Glad you noticed the reflection. I had to work on that part!
      I found I could only fracture a little but I think it is much better for what I did do.
      I am enjoying your blog.

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  13. The revival really added some life to that teapot. It looks great. The red is luscious.

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  14. It seems hard to perfect the already perfect ... but you can do it! I wonder, I admire and I learn something new everyday!Thanks, Julie!

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    1. Thanks, grandmother Rita! Glad you found time to blog.

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  15. The second painting is more assertive which works well. I am so happy it is sold. I paint over many old paintings and sand them as you do but even so, sometimes the palette knife just does not work as well as on a new board. But then you do get those lovely bits of color popping through...... which is a very good thing in my book!

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    1. I do agree that it is more assertive. The colors are bolder and that is why. My handy shaper worked better on this surface than the knife but I used a brush too.

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  16. The second work is much more assertive which I think works well. I am so glad that it is sold. Working on old boards can be fun. I sand as you do and I also find that my palette knife does not flow as well as on a new board. But those little bits of old color peeking through are lots of fun.

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  17. The new search feature works so well. I used it to pull up your older posts on "fracturing."
    I find it very interesting that the focal point of your still life changed (at least, for me) from the first version to the second. Almost all the objects remain the same with point-of-view shifts being quite subtle and yet in the original the mug is my focal and in the more recent the teapot. Perhaps it's that beautiful red or maybe the inclusion of the graphic little leaf on the teapot.
    And thanks for omitting the verification thing!

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    1. The focal point changed to the linking of teapot AND mug by adding the darker leaf on the pot. Glad you noticed.
      Also pleased to know you enjoyed not having to do the frustrating verification.

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  18. My first comment didn't go through, Julie...but I just wanted to tell you that this painting is amazing as always..I love the reflections of the lemon in the cup!!

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    1. How sweet of you to come back, Hilda. Yours was one I lost this morning and blogger is not working from my Picasa tonight.

      Thank for noticing the reflections.

      Your Chinatown is really good.

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I love that you are taking the time to comment and thank you for it. I am sure other readers will enjoy them too. If you cannot comment through this format then email me at juliefordoliver@gmail.com
Cheers,
Julie