Personal Art Blog

Sharing the lessons I teach at the Artist Guild and the personal discoveries in my art.

Monday, October 29, 2012

Blue and White Study



Blue and White Study

8x6in oil on canvas panel  $125. SOLD

I love blue and white china and I think it goes
back to my childhood. There was a lot of it around.
The north of England was home to the potteries
and everyone appeared to have a good assortment.
Blue Willow, Blue Onion and Wedgwood were
some of what I remember.

Artist Note.

I was trying to push the different types of white
and blues in this piece. The light was directly
overhead and I could clearly see the change
in the blue background near the top area in color
as well as value. It toned down in saturation as well
as deeper values while merging into the lower area.
That happened to be the easy part.
The whites were more difficult as the areas
with blue patterns still picked up the reflected light
which bounced around. I painted the white first
and then added the patterns painting wet into wet.




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32 comments:

  1. Wow...the way you did the elegant designs around the edges of the pieces...way way pretty! And the pinks, yellows and orange color at the bottom of them makes them glow.

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    1. Thanks, Lisa. I really enjoyed seeing all the great photos from your show.

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  2. Completely elegant and beautiful- One of my favs!

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    1. What a lovely word - elegant. Thanks so much, Mary.
      Your path in the woods is beautifil.

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  3. Another gorgeous piece Julie, white and blue china is one of my favorites, too...an evergreen. xx

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    1. Thank you so much, Jane. it is true isn't it - an evergreen. I like the way you worded it.
      The impressionist flowers you did have so much life and color.

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  4. I'd be hard pressed to pick a favorite of your works, Julie. I just love them all. This is no exception. I love that you added the purple grapes as blue, purple, (and green) make up my favorite palette of colors.

    I've been sitting here trying to remember the pattern of dishes my grandparents had. I think they were a brown pattern with bits of yellow and green in the center, but I'm not sure. All of those types of dishes would be so hard to find and if found, so expensive!

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    1. Glad you noticed the grapes. I included them for design and my darkest dark because they do have a blue cast.
      Love your pics of your loom and what you are weaving.

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  5. Exquisite! Your fracturing only enhances the beauty of the china pattern. Lovely use of color.

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  6. Blue is a color so charming!
    It was also a very difficult color to manufacture,ancient painters had only the rare and expensive blue of lapis lazuli ... now we are lucky to have in our palettes wonderful blue colors and durable to light! Your still life, with the precious porcelains, and Blue so declined in many different Blues , is MAGIC !

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    1. My dear Rita - I thank you for reminding me how lucky I am to have the tube colors. I remember that ivory black was used, very cleverly, as a blue. Put it next to a warm after mixing a little white into it and it appears very blue..

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  7. It is very elegant as mentioned above. I love blue and white pottery also and have collected some transfer ware over the years. There is something so crisp and lovely about it.

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    1. Thank you, Libby. I agree about the crisp and lovely.
      talk about crisp and lovely - you have one crisp and one in a different technique on your blog today and both are lovely.

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  8. I love the lighting, is almost like the china is self-lighted! And what a wonderful work on the patterns you did Julie!! The whole is very -as previous bloggers commented- elegant.
    Hugs and Smiles.

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    1. You are very sweet and I thank you. I find any white, lighted from above looks luminous.
      A hug and a smile back to you.

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  9. Glow is right! Glows and shimmers. Your ability to capture depth with your choice of color is remarkable. Would you be willing to share your favorite brand and color of blues?

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    1. Thanks and of course I will share.

      The blues I use are:
      Any brand Ultramarine blue. This is my main blue which I mix with all my yellows for greens and with reds for purple.
      Cobalt pale or light. I use Holbein.
      Holbein's Blue gray - to lighten - I use Holbein's blue violet, gray too.
      Turquoise. I like La Franc but so far I find them pretty much all the same. It has replaced my cerulean.

      For some reason I cannot use Thalo Blue as it doesn't work for me.
      Hope this helps

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  10. Loved studying the overhead lighting. It must have been difficult as you said. The texture and subtle changes of value and color are just beautiful.

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    1. Thank you Helen. You did a good job with Miss Pretty #2

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  11. Ah Julie - the blue and white dishes is a favorite for me. This painting not only is beautiful but evokes memories of my grandma's
    blue and white dishes. Thanks for making me smile.

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    1. I am so glad it brought back happy memories, Debbie. Thanks for letting me know.

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  12. I love this painting! You've surfaced for me some good memories of Blue Willow. I had a few odd pieces, and enjoyed hours of looking in antique stores for them. Your explanations are so thorough. It helps me TRY to be more aware of these nuances in my own paintings. Thank you, Julie!!

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    1. And I thank YOU, Carol.
      Your pomegranate and bird is lovely

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  13. I love the colors in this one. Especially the hints of purple. Well done.

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    1. Thanks Roger. Loved your berries and leaves too.

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  14. Your blue china is painted beautifully and the grapes are just the perfect addition to your still life, Julie. Thank you for sharing your blue china painting method.

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  15. Beautiful, Julie! I went back over your recent paintings and all are beautiful.

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  16. How nice of you Kathryn, thank you.
    Your paintings are simply gorgeous.

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I love that you are taking the time to comment and thank you for it. I am sure other readers will enjoy them too. If you cannot comment through this format then email me at juliefordoliver@gmail.com
Cheers,
Julie