Personal Art Blog

Sharing the lessons I teach at the Artist Guild and the personal discoveries in my art.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Waterfall and Demo



Waterfall
8x6in oil on canvas
work in process

Artist Note.
Working from a gesso mono print
and using the imagination.

First Step.
 See video showing 

I started with a gesso mono print made by
using both black and white gesso.
I used a Raymar canvas board to press into 
the black and white gesso mixture. 
Paper does a fine job also.

I lifted it off and turned the board and 
pressed down again leaving the above image.

Using my imagination I looked for shapes 
I could already "see"  a subject forming from.
There it was...
The angle of gray running across made 
me think of water and rocks.
The texture made from the gesso was great.

I used transparent colors to test out 
the imagery and I could have painted the
whole painting this way if I wanted to. 
Building layers of glazes and scumbling
in some areas.


This is where the individual's own response 
has to be listened to. I decided to go into 
it with the palette knife...and had a heck of a 
lot of fun. In fact I am still nibbling at it.

The role of imagination in painting is not necessary
to be a good painter. 
In my opinion, it IS a necessary exercise to explore
everything you can to find out if that little voice
inside responds with pleasure - or not!
A multitude of pleasures eventually becomes our
own distinctive style.

To see a sample using paper from my 
September 27th post of this technique

43 comments:

  1. its obvious how much joy you gleaned out of working this way, it shows in the work. You have used intuitive painting style combined with your sense of excellent painting design to come up with a corker!

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  2. I laughed at 'corker" - used very much in my background.
    Thanks Sally. When I visited your blog I was delighted to see that you are very creative also. We are lucky!

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  3. Bonsoir,

    J'aime la manière que vous parlez de votre créativité. Je pense effectivement qu'il faut laisser vos émotions devenir le guide de votre peinture. La toile blanche est en quelque sorte le fauteuil du psy. !
    Les erreurs dans une peinture deviennent presque des exactitudes si elles sont spontanée et sincères. Elles ne choquent nullement, peut-être seulement au spectateur qui ne comprend pas et ne pénètre pas dans l'univers de votre peinture.

    J'aime beaucoup l'ambiance de cette dernière peinture... où le son de la nature semble également si présent.

    Gros bisous ♡

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    1. Hi Martine - thank you for your observations. I love what you wrote...especially... the errors in a painting almost become accuracies!
      Your new painting of flowers is gorgeous and I enjoyed seeing all the other works.

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  4. The texture on the waterfall is outstanding, Julie!!! LOVE this so much!!! I know it's a WIP but I love it the way it is!!!

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    1. I enjoyed adding the texture, Hilda. I started off without it using thin paint but then got really into hearing the water and birds...and carried on painting.

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  5. Experimentation is the best. Wonderful start......

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    1. I notice you also experiment around, trying new ways with your paint. I always enjoy visiting your blog. Example - how about the simplicity of your new fruit painting. I love it.

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  6. It is absolutely beautiful ! Seeing the small picture on my dashboard my first thought is I saw a John Singer Sargent watercolor , Julie it's a wonderful job !
    (sorry for my poor English : thank you Google traduction, I know it is not really English language ... !!)

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    1. Good to hear from you. Thank you for the HUGE complement regarding Sargent. I saw your drawing of the young boy and was charmed. Very strong drawing but capturing a sensitive mood. I also found your phone and ipad covers. Wonderful. I bet you sell loads of them.

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  7. How wonderful...SPLAT....and just like that you have pure coolness on your board. Great demo video Julie! Sure was great to hear your voice too. :)

    I absolutely love what you said...a multitude of pleasures becomes our own distinct style. You always put things so well.

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    1. I lol at... SPLAT! What a great way to start my day, Lisa, thank you.
      Glad ..a multitude of pleasures... resonated with you. It is so true isn't it?
      Being aware that we should listen to our "good" internal responses instead of our negative, critical ones .
      You said in your blog you have been painting up a storm. Cant wait to see them all. Love Tapestries.

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  8. I forgot to say how lovely the lines of blue water are. I can hear it running.

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  9. Very thoughtful, philosophical post, Julie! I love what you said about the imagination not always being a necessity in producing a painting... but for some of us it IS a necessity in that everything feels right and we've expressed the connection that happened between ourselves and the composition we are creating. You described that so perfectly, in the way that you begin putting pigment on, and taking it off, until you begin to see the images and forms that naturally come about, when the subject matter, the artist, and the mediums all work together.

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    1. Thanks for taking the time to write this comment, Katherine. You have explained it very well and between the two if us it re-enforces personal expression in our work. I like how you put it -
      the subject, artist and medium - all work together.

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    2. Excellent observations, Katherine!

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  10. I will definitely have to try this. Love this post.

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    1. Reading your busy schedule made even me tired so I do appreciate you sending this comment. Have a relaxing day, Sharon - if you can!!!

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  11. Julie, it never ceases to amaze me what comes from your imagination. This painting is wonderful! Also, thanks for your comment on my blog today.

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    1. Thanks Audrey. Pleased you like it.
      Well I love your new city painting but I still have not got over how great your two red chair painting is.

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  12. J'adore cette peinture, elle est pleine de caractère, de votre univers mais en même temps vous réussissez à nous le faire partager..;comme c'est agréable de ressentir quelque chose devant une toile et d'être touchée !

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    1. And I am touched by your words. Thanks for visiting. I love the colors and texture in your mountain painting.

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  13. What a fun process you've come up with, Julie! And it turned out to be such a lovely painting. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. It is fun but I think serious work could come out of it.
      I enjoyed reading your experiences painting late day landscapes.
      Beautiful results.

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  14. I love the way this painting was started off with an experimental note, it is always exciting to try this way since you we dont have an exact vision of the final output, thus sustaining our curiosity to the end.It is already looking so beautiful. Thanks for your visits and feedback, always an honor to hear from you!

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    1. I think we are both intuitive painters, Padmaja. Adding or own touch happens before we know it. Like the way you added the figures to your painting "Storm" as you said - an afterthought?
      No need to thank me - I love visiting your blog.

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  15. Replies
    1. Congratulations on your new independence.
      Hope your tests went well, dear friend. Rough time. Here is a hug.

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  16. Very wonderful painting with amazing colours !!!
    Have a nice day Julie !!!

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    1. Thank you so much.
      Your colors are amazing in your beautiful painting of such a beautiful, historical town

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  17. I love seeing your process, the fun is there for you and for us to feast our eyes on! Beautiful!

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    1. The process works on watercolor paper too. .. neat as can be.
      Thanks Celia.
      Are you are still busy with your sketchbook? Gorgeous!

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  18. Dear Julie - your waterfall is extraordinary. Love seeing how you worked up your value plan and then let your imagination take you where it wants. Love your work with the palette knife...adds so much texture and makes it outstanding. I hope you are having a beautiful day. Hugs

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    1. How nice you are. Thank, dear Debbie. Texture is nice to do with a knife. I painted an old water jug today with layers of mica over the original clay. Fun fun to do.
      How lovely your trading cards are. The cat is so perfect and so small.
      I have seen the cards at Hobby Lobby, but thought they were too small to get something worthwhile on. I found I was wrong after seeing what you have painted. yes...lovely

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  19. A beautiful waterfall so fresh...colors and motion lively!!!
    I always like to read what encourages people to let go of the worry of the result, to get fully into a creative action. I really admire all your articles that encourage this attitude and that give us ,as readers, the right explanation for staying creative, free, learning well the important things to know.
    Thanks Julie, for your so helpful communication and sharing (I live in a world where the Master does not speak easily of his art as if it diminish the value of what he does. Yet this is a beautiful ancient tradition of art ... Leonardo wrote much of his art, and we can still read his thoughts.)

    I wish you nice week end !

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    1. I loved seeing your post with a clear demo of you experimenting. here we go together!
      Your painting is so beautiful and what fun to find you use vodka during the process...but not drinking it!

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  20. so beautiful - i can hear the water falling!

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  21. I waited to comment until I tried this. You are right. It was TOTALLY fun! I deviated from what you suggested because I had something in mind prior to but I made two gessoed pieces and so will have another go at it. It took the pressure off of wanting to create something a little more abstract from scratch. I see a lot of potential for this idea so thank you so much. Your tips and suggestions are always spot on and very generous:)

    The piece above is beautiful by the way. You know how I love rocks and water.

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  22. What a wonderful post. I would like to try this technique. Beautiful work.

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  23. Ooh this is luscious Julie! The sparkle and shine on the water is dazzling - it almost looks more real than real life. Scintillating!!

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  24. P.S. I love what you said about our multitude of pleasures eventually becoming our distinctive style. Very profound and insightful!

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I love that you are taking the time to comment and thank you for it. I am sure other readers will enjoy them too. If you cannot comment through this format then email me at juliefordoliver@gmail.com
Cheers,
Julie