Personal Art Blog

Sharing the lessons I teach at the Artist Guild and the personal discoveries in my art.

Friday, July 13, 2012

Oleander Bouquet



Oleander Bouquet

8x6in  oil on canvas panel  $125. SOLD

All good things must end, and my trip down memory lane painting Yellowstone
from my sketchbook, is over, and I am rather sad to see it come to an end.
It was very enjoyable painting and then reminiscing with my hubby. He has a
great memory and we spent some happy evenings enjoying the trip all over again.

Artist Note.

Oh boy - after all those landscapes with a specific focus, it was hard
to get back into painting a still life again. I really admire those artists who
seem to be able to switch back and forth at will. It took me a while to get into
the landscape flow and now it will take me a couple of days to get the still
life flow back.
Does that happen to anyone else? Any suggestions?


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26 comments:

  1. I just sat down to see if my cursor has stopped jumping all over the place after I rebooted, and there is this gorgeous still life. You haven't missed a step. The painting looks great.

    Today I changed my pace with a still life, and it was wonderful. While I waited for paint to dry, I even worked on a landscape--and that went well. It's when I switch back to portraiture that it will take me some time to adjust to the slower, more cautious rhythm.

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  2. That is a great idea - to change my pace and work between a landscape and back. Thanks L.W.

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  3. Sometimes,Julie, I seem to have places and things in my head and when I move into this inner world, I suffer change. Working on several watercolors is a way to stay flexible! Sometimes on Monday I have a kind of demagnetization and I do not remember where I had been! Creative work is sensitive to "everything" in good and less good! Your still life is great!maybe the choice of colors is a gorgeous vibration of the last painted landscapes.

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    1. Another great suggestion. It is similar to L.W.'s idea of changing my pace and have have other things to work on. I like the way you used "demagnetization" because that fits perfectly. I do become totally focused on the one piece I am working on and I mean focused!
      I am going to try incorporated your way of thinking with L.W.'s and see what i come up with.
      Thank you, Rita.

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  4. Beautiful painting, Julie. I enjoyed your landscapes very much and I understand what you mean about switching back and forth from one subject to another.... landscapes to still life, etc., and getting into the flow of each. I believe you are like me and thrive on a variety of subject matter. I agree with L.W. Roth, you haven't missed a beat !

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    1. Nice of you to comment, carol. Thank you. Yes, I do like variety, but not the loss of flow so trying some new work habits maybe will fix it.
      The photos from the botanical gardens are awesome. You are good with that camera.

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  5. Consistently breath taking, mature strong and confidant work. It is a joy and privileged to follow your journey.

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    1. And you , Edward, are a true gentleman. Thank you!

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  6. You don't seem to be having a problem from my end. This one is beautiful as usual:) The flowers are pretty of course but I love your grouping of those three similar objects. You've used that space well. That (the grouping and deciding) is always a stumbling block for me with still life work.

    I tend to start thinking about new subjects about halfway or so through the current painting. It's like a dual thinking process I guess in that thinking about a new subject motivates me to finish the current painting and working on the current painting (knowing I can finish) motivates me to get to the new subject matter:) Maybe this will help?

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  7. Thanks for the excellent comments. I will try to think about the "next painting" while still working on one. I do think ahead when I do a series and actually jot down notes of my plans so I can refer to them. I also go with the flow when working on a painting and if I come across an area which I find intriguing or difficult, I will set up something to work on next, relating to it... to see if I can solve the problem or discover what intrigued me. I did not seem to have this problem before i started doing a complete painting a day so new habits will be a help.

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  8. I'm by no means an expert but I've had a lot of change to overcome in my life which has made me flexible. From reading your blogs you do this anyway but I would say to focus on colour, light and medium. When you stop thinking about what you're painting and focus on the above it doesn't matter whether it's a Still Life, Portrait, Abstract or any other genre. It's all in the mind and the self talk we are listening to. Change the words and change your life.

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    1. This makes a lot of sense and I REALLY appreciate it and hope others reading it will too.
      I usually only see shapes of color in anything I paint, but the big difference to me is that the colors in the landscape are much more neutral than what I tend to choose for my still life. Maybe I should punch up the colors in the landscape?
      Anyway I am going to try to, "Change the Words and change my life!!!!"

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  9. I can't see any difference, but I am sure you get that feeling. For me it is a matter of detail and confidence. Your painting looks stunning as usual.

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    1. Hi Roger - you are right , it is the "feeling" because it becomes a struggle. After a few days it flows again.
      Confidence is missing!

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  10. wonderful work...enjoyed going thro' your blog

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    1. Thanks and I enjoyed going through yours just now. You are quite the poet.

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  11. Gorgeous piece, Julie!! I love that vase!

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    1. I love the vase too - my mother made it. You have good taste!

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  12. Great light and texture, as always! Very confident and strong.
    Happy Painting.

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    1. Hi Nora -thanks for saying it didn't look like the struggle it was.

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  13. Hi Julie: I don't know if you are familiar with Randal David Tipton's artwork, but if not you should check out his blog. He did a whole series of the thermal pools at yellowstone that you might like to see!

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    1. Thanks for the tip about Randel. I enjoyed visiting his work, found two of the pools and was thrilled.

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  14. You make it look easy, Julie! But...that's a lot of work and often a very hard job to pull off. Lol
    I too have problems switching sometimes.
    This painting looks wonderful!

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    1. Glad to know you do too. I am trying some of the hints given.
      Thanks, Dean.

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  15. This is beautiful, Julie.....love this painting !

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  16. Another beauty. I have no suggestions other that just keep painting what you love. I can switch topics...but what I can't do is have more than one work going. It's just too confusing for this middle aged mind. :)

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I love that you are taking the time to comment and thank you for it. I am sure other readers will enjoy them too. If you cannot comment through this format then email me at juliefordoliver@gmail.com
Cheers,
Julie